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Course Descriptions

Individual courses of instruction are subject to change or cancellation at any time and may not be offered each trimester or every year. Any course may be withdrawn from current offerings if the number of registrants is too small to justify conducting the course. Students interested in a particular course during a particular period should inquire in advance and/or consult with the Director of Academic and Student Affairs.

ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting (3). This course introduces the basic principles of accounting theory and practice. Primary areas of study include the theory of debit and credit, accounts, special journals, the accounting cycle, notes and interest, accruals and deferrals, receivables, inventory, plant assets, and the preparation of financial statements. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 1301 Art Appreciation I (3).  Films, lectures, slides, and discussions focus on the theoretical, cultural, and historical aspects of the visual arts.  Emphasis is on the development of visual and aesthetic awareness.
ARTS 1303 Survey of Art History (3). This course will trace the major developments in the history of Western and non-Western art from prehistoric times to the 21st century.  Course material will emphasize the contextual and cultural evolution of the history of art and its impact on global society. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 1311 Design I (3).  Basic concepts of design with two-dimensional materials including the use of color, illusion of space or mass, texture, value, shape, and size in composition.
ARTS 1312 Design II (3). This course explores the elements and principles of art using two- and three-dimensional concepts. This is a continuation of those principles and techniques learned in ARTS 1311 Design I. Prerequisite: ARTS 1311 Design I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 1316 Drawing I (3).  Investigation of drawing media and techniques including the use of color, illusion of space or mass, texture, value, shape, and size in composition.
ARTS 1317 Drawing II (3). This course provides an investigation of drawing media and techniques including expressive possibilities and an extended development of observational study.  This is a continuation of those elements and techniques acquired in ARTS 1316 Drawing I. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316 Drawing I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 1320 Interior Design Studio I (3).  This is a studio course in interior design.  Professional techniques used in the planning of a design or renovation project are introduced.  Space planning, materials selection, and project presentation skills are emphasized.  Prerequisite: INTD 1375 Design Drawing and Presentation.
ARTS 1321 Interior Design Studio II (3).  This course utilizes professional techniques as applied to complex problems to create innovative design solutions.  Projects emphasize the utilization of technology, materials, color, and lighting, through programming, design drawings, and project documentation.  Prerequisite: ARTS 1320 Interior Design Studio I.
ARTS 1370 Survey of Graphic Design (3).  This course surveys the evolution of visual communication through the current state of graphic communication.  Fundamental design components of design theory are explored, allowing students to create, execute, and present projects.
ARTS 1371 Typography (3).  This course focuses on the history of type and the technical construction and application of typography as it is used in visual communication.
ARTS 1375 Perspective Drawing (3).  This course offers techniques in one-point and two-point perspective, and color rendering in three-dimensional drawings.
ARTS 2303 Art Appreciation II (3). A continuation of ARTS 1301 Art Appreciation I. This course will trace the major developments in art by focusing on Western and Non-Western Civilizations from the 17th century to the 21st century.  Course material will emphasize the contextual and cultural evolution of art and its impact on global society. Prerequisite: ARTS 1301 Art Appreciation I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 2313 Digital Image Manipulation (3).  This course introduces the student to the computer as an art tool with emphasis on design principles and visual communications.  Instruction is devoted to basic computer graphic technology including illustration and photo-editing software and electronic imaging techniques.
ARTS 2314 Computer Illustration (3).  Using advanced computer graphic techniques, the student computer artist increases proficiency in using state-of-the-art software and hardware technologies to create illustrations.
ARTS 2370 Desktop Publishing (3).  Sophisticated computer graphics applications used in design, manufacturing, and marketing are studied.  Using specialized graphics hardware and software, students develop advertising materials and product layouts.
ARTS 2371 Brand Publishing (3). This course is a project-oriented study of the concepts and methods of electronic desktop publishing in the digital or print medium. Features essential to multimedia presentations are integrated with techniques necessary for creating brand publications with consistent and cohesive graphic layouts utilizing industry standard production methods for successful project completion. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 Desktop Publishing and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I (3).  This course offers lectures, demonstrations, and studio work to assist the student in developing a portfolio.  All projects are completed using the most professional standards, emphasizing quality and relevant subject matter. Prerequisites: ARTS 1371 Typography or ARTS 1370 Survey of Graphic Design.
ARTS 2375 Graphic Design Portfolio II (3).  This course covers branding and how packaging helps to support it. Part one of the course will cover the steps in creating the brand, including logo development. Part two will cover the history of packaging, techniques, and hand skills needed to create layouts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I.
ARTS 2376 Photographic Applications (3). This course focuses on techniques that will help the student work efficiently and effectively in applicable software. The course will introduce the creation and manipulation of original digital imagery utilizing the integration of multiple elements, including product packaging, event signage, logos, and other brand identity vehicles while considering the importance of product placement, user experience, and overall visual aesthetics of the commercial environment as it relates to the consumer. Prerequisite: ARTS 2313 Digital Image Manipulation and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 2377 Vector Graphics (3). This course focuses on techniques that will help the student work efficiently and effectively in applicable software. Students will create successful commercial solutions from concept to execution; this will include product packaging, event signage, logos, and other brand identity vehicles. Prerequisite: ARTS 2314 Computer Illustration and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
ARTS 2378 Digital Art (3).  This course explores the potential of the computer hardware and software medium for their visual, conceptual, and practical uses in the visual arts.
BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications (3). This course focuses on computer terminology, hardware, software, operating systems, and information systems relating to the business environment. The main focus of this course is on business applications of software, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, and business-oriented utilization of the Internet.
BUSI 1311 Sales and Promotion (3).  This course focuses on principles of personal salesmanship including methods and tasks applicable to a wide variety of industries and commercial settings.
BUSI 1301 Business Principles (3).  This course is an introduction to the role of business in modern society and it includes overview of business perations, analysis of the specialized fields within the business organization, and development of a business vocabulary.
BUSI 2301 Business Law I (3).  Principles of law which form the legal framework for business activity.  The judicial process and court system, contract law, tort and criminal law, product liability law, title and risk of loss in sales of goods, and business organization and regulation are specifically covered.
BUSI 2302 Business Law II (3). A review of the judicial system is followed by a study of alternate dispute resolution, civil procedure, discharge and remedies, sales and lease of goods contracts, performance and breach of sales contracts, consumer protection, personal and real property, bailments, negotiable instruments, insurance, principal and agency relationships and operations, and employment laws. Prerequisite: BUSI 2301 Business Law and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
BUSI 2375 Entrepreneurship (3). This course demonstrates the components of entrepreneurship as they relate to the operation of a successful business for-profit.  The key components of the business planning process, including entrepreneur opportunities, effective market strategies, financial business management practices, as well as an overview of legal and risk management issues, are emphasized.  The composition of a comprehensive business plan will serve as the final, capstone project for the course. Business plans will be evaluated by an External Advisory Council (EAC). Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
BUSI 2377 Global Business (3). This course will examine the opportunities and threats companies face in the global business environment. Students will be introduced to the environmental elements, cross-cultural challenges and varied market opportunities American companies face in international settings. Students will recognize the competitive advantages and nuances of entry into global business. Prerequisite: BUSI 1301 Business Principles and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
COMM 2315 Public Speaking (3). This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Prerequisite: SPCH 1311 Introduction to Communication and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
DMAT 0075 Fundamentals of Mathematics (0).  This course focuses on topics in mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notation, geometry, and real and complex number systems. Placement into DMAT 0075 is dependent on the student’s ACCUPLACER Arithmetic test score.
DCOM 0095 Fundamentals of Composition (0).  This course focuses on development of fundamental writing skills such as idea generation, organization, style, utilization of standard English, and revision. Placement into DCOM 0095 is dependent on the student’s ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills test score.
DESI 1375 Fashion Design I (3).  This course provides an introduction to apparel design and manufacturing.  Industrial machinery and garment construction techniques are covered.  Basic patternmaking techniques are introduced.  Construction of dress, pant, and knit top is taught; woven construction techniques are introduced.
DESI 1376 Fashion Design II (3).  This course covers flat patternmaking.  Students develop a bodice, sleeve, collar, and skirt.  Construction of muslin samples and conceptual design project are emphasized. Prerequisite: DESI 1375 Fashion Design I.
DESI 1377 Fashion CAD I (3).  This course focuses on working with images, color, and print/fabric design to build and merchandise complete fashion collections.  This course also focuses on conceptualizing fashion design ideas using the computer as a design tool. Principles of drawing flats and garment details and working with print and color using industry-specific computer software are emphasized.
DESI 1379 Fashion Sketching (3).  An introductory course in fashion drawing skills that includes rendering fashion figures and garments.  Various media and techniques are introduced to depict design and detail.  Hand-drawn flats are also covered.
DESI 2377 Fashion Design III (3).  This course focuses on advanced patternmaking and apparel design using draping and flat processes.  Design research, embellishment, garment analysis, and design development are emphasized.   This course includes construction of muslin samples; conceptual design projects are also required.  Advanced knit construction is introduced. Prerequisite: DESI 1376 Fashion Design II.
DESI 2378 Fashion Design IV (3).  Advanced techniques of garment construction and design are addressed.  Line development, research, and product development are emphasized.  Design and construction of an original 3-piece collection in fashion fabric using patternmaking, draping techniques, cost analysis, marketability, and creativity are required. Prerequisite: DESI 2377 Fashion Design III.
DESI 2379 Fashion CAD II (3).  This course focuses on advanced techniques for development of the fashion flat and fashion illustration using industry-standard CAD programs. Prerequisite: DESI 1377 Fashion CAD I.
ENGL 1301 Composition I (3).  Principles and techniques of written composition, textual analysis, and critical thinking are the focus.  (3 Hrs. Lec.) Prerequisite: DCOM 0095 or an appropriate assessment test score.
ENGL 1302 Composition II (3). This course will include expository and persuasive composition, as well as an analysis of literary, expository, and persuasive texts. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 Composition I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
FASH 2372 Advanced Patternmaking (3).  This course allows students to advance from the study and application of the basic principles of patternmaking to a more comprehensive view of design utilizing flat pattern methods and principles. Basic slopers are developed from measurements to industry standards. Prerequisite: DESI 1376 Fashion Design II and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
FASH 2374 Tailoring and Advanced Draping (3). This course allows students to elevate their basic sewing skills to an advanced level. Construction utilizing hand-tailoring methods is covered. Through lectures and demonstrations, students evaluate different levels of quality garments to better understand construction and costing. Students will explore principles of draping as a method of designing original garments in three-dimensional form. Advanced draping techniques and construction skills are also. Prerequisite: DESI 2377 Fashion Design III and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
FASH 2376 Technical Design (3). This course covers sketching and specification drawings for the professional designer. The course also emphasizes communicating with manufacturers, pattern-makers, and assistants regarding garment construction, detailing, and fabrication. Prerequisite: DESI 2379 Fashion CAD II and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
FASH 2378 Knit and Swim Wear Studio (3). In this studio course, students develop a collection of knitwear utilizing market research and forecasting services; the collection builds upon the student’s technical, creative, and industry knowledge. Students will execute an original design using industry techniques. Prerequisites: FASH 2372 Advanced Patternmaking, FASH 2374 Tailoring and Advanced Draping, and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
FASH 2379 Evening and Bridal Wear Studio (3). In this studio course, students are introduced to the specialized design field of bridal and evening wear. Through market research, students explore the areas of formal and semi-formal wear, as well as apparel in both the American and international markets. Students will develop a collection of bridal or evening wear designs and execute an original design using industry techniques. Prerequisites: FASH 2372 Advanced Patternmaking, FASH 2374 Tailoring and Advanced Draping, and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
GRPH 2372 Art Direction (3). This course covers a comprehensive understanding of how ideas become branded visual communications that engage, capture, and persuade audiences. The course also emphasizes combining the fundamental tools of visual communication with creative brainstorming to arrive at fresh, branded concepts. The course will also put an emphasis on the visual, verbal, and conceptual skills of advertising strategies to create effec­tive storyboards, web sites, and more. The use of typography, composition, photography, and illustration is implemented into each project. Prerequisite: ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
GRPH 2374 Advanced Design Methodologies (3). In this course, students will analyze and creatively develop effective written and visual communication. They will plan, create, and give rationale for their design decisions for two or three-dimensional layouts for different audiences and contexts. The course will also cover communication theory, way finding, dynamic information design, signage, and interactive media. Prerequisite: ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
GRPH 2376 Small Media Strategies (3). The course introduces participants to interface design in the context of hand-held media devices. The course will provide hands-on programming training as well as interaction design techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
GRPH 2377 Web Design Basics (3). This course introduces the basic methods and techniques of developing websites by learning basic HTML coding, navigation, file naming conventions, image preparation and optimization. While learning the fundamental principles of visual communication, the student will create exciting and effective websites using a content management system such as Wordpress.
GRPH 2378 Time Based Compositing and Special Effects (3). Topics covered in this course will include video compositing, layered timelines, working in 3D space, precision driven time-based motion graphics and special effect techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2373 Graphic Design Portfolio I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
GRPH 2379 Web Design (3). This course will expand upon the methods and techniques of developing websites using Dreamweaver. Students will review basic web page HTML/CSS coding, and learn more about page layout, interactive design, responsive web design and FTP while utilizing the fundamental principles of visual communication in order to create exciting and effective websites. Prerequisite: GRPH 2377 Web Design Basics and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
HECO 1320 Textiles (3).  This course focuses on analysis of fibers, yarns, and finishes as related to end use, performance, and care of textile products.
INTD 1371 Computer Aided Drafting I (3). This course is an introduction to interior design applications.  Instruction includes an introduction to AutoCAD drawing, digital imaging software, and three dimensional drawing software, exploring foundation tools and the interrelation of these three applications to generate drawings, renderings, etc.
INTD 1373 Survey of Decorative Arts (3).  This is a research-based course focusing on the decorative quality, beauty, craftsmanship, and design period of objects used in environments that serve an ornamental and functional purpose, including ceramics, furniture, glass, metalwork, and textilesINTD 1374 Survey of Interior Design (3).  This course provides an introduction to interior design covering the principles and elements of interior design with emphasis on the history of architecture, interior design, art, and furniture.
INTD 1375 Design Drawing and Presentation (3).  This course focuses on developing mechanical drafting with an emphasis on the technical skills necessary to produce design drawings.  Techniques and methods are also developed to create formal presentations using a combination of visual communication skills and technology.
INTD 1376 Space Planning (3).
This course introduces the student to residential space planning as applied to the interior environment.  Emphasis will be placed on the design process, design elements and principles, furniture arrangement, typical planning guidelines, and presentation skills. Prerequisite: INTD 1375 Design Drawing and Presentation.
INTD 1377 Kitchen and Bath Design (3). 
A continuation of INTD 1375 Design Drawing and Presentation.  This is a studio course in kitchen and bath design.  Professional techniques used in the planning of a design or renovation project are introduced.  Space planning, materials selection, and project presentation skills are emphasized.
INTD 2370 Lighting Design
(3). This course presents an integrated approach to lighting design.  The student is exposed to the lighting design process as it relates to interior design.  The course provides opportunity to develop techniques to identify the appropriate lighting source from a range of options and to evaluate their resulting impact.  The student develops a lighting vocabulary while creating skills driven by technical and design principles associated with lighting. In addition, skills are developed which are required to successfully convey lighting design through industry-standard techniques. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2371 Interior Materials and Systems (3).  This course provides a broad study of interior finishes and furnishings.  The specification, composition, construction, and application/usability of finishes and furnishings are also covered.  Course topics include sustainable materials and finishes, mechanical systems, market resources, and industry terminology.
INTD 2372 Topics in Interior Design (3). This course covers a matrix of information in which students examine current issues of relevance to interior design.  The topics of discussion include aesthetics, environment, social, gender, and philosophy.  Readings, lectures, and discussions act as a catalyst to critical thinking and design skills.  Course content and required product may vary each offering.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2373 Color Theory for Interior Design (3). This course introduces the use of color and application as it pertains to interior environments. Color theory, psychology of color and how it affects the brain and moods are discussed.  Included in the course is the vocabulary of color, color temperatures, and the principles of the color wheel and how to use it. Students explore an organized and systematic approach to developing color schemes for interiors. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2374 Interior Design Studio III (3).  In this studio course, students are introduced to a specific user group and commercial project type such as institutional, corporate, hospitality, or retail.  Particular focus will be given to the impact of codes and regulations on interior design.  Students will explore materials and finishes appropriate for commercial use.  Direct contact with clients and end users will be provided as available and as deemed necessary. Oral presentations with graphic two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional techniques will be the primary tool to communicate project solutions. Prerequisite: ARTS 1321 Interior Design Studio II and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2376 Interior Design Studio IV (3).  In this studio course, students continue to study and apply design principles related to a specific user group and commercial project type such as institutional, corporate, hospitality, or retail. Special emphasis is placed on sustainable interior design solutions by exploring sustainable materials and finishes appropriate for commercial use. Oral presentations with graphic two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional techniques will be the primary tool to communicate project solutions. Prerequisite: INTD 2374 Interior Design Studio III and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2378 Interior Design Studio V (3). This studio course serves as the second part of a two-course sequence dedicated to the development and production of an approved major interior design project.  Professional level drawings, models, and other supporting materials will be created and presented as they relate to the topic and project pursued. Emphasis is placed on a high degree of complexity and challenge within the design project. Prerequisite: INTD 2374 Interior Design Studio IV and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 2375 Presentation Drawing (3). This course offers techniques in one-point and two-point perspective and conceptual design.  Students will translate their perspective drawings and designs into a graphical presentation using industry-standard software.
INTD 2377 Computer Aided Drafting II (3). This course primarily focuses on advanced mastery of three-dimensional drawing software to address current building information modeling software used by architects, structural engineers, interior designers and contractors. Users learn how to design structures and components in 3D, annotate models with 2D drafting elements, and access building information from the building model's database. Revit is 4D BIM capable with tools to plan and track various stages in the building's lifecycle, from concept to construction and later demolition.  Prerequisite: INTD 1371 Computer Aided Drafting I.
INTD 2379 Computer Aided Drafting III (3). This course covers a wide range of advanced techniques in building information modeling and parametric solid modeling.  Students explore advanced rendering techniques, animation, creating families of custom components, and collaborating on a design. Graphic presentations, in both printed and digital formats, are the primary tools used to communicate project understanding. Prerequisites: INTD 1371 Computer Aided Drafting I, INTD 2377 Computer Aided Drafting II, and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 3371 Construction and Detailing for Interior Design (3). This course bridges the gap between design and construction and introduces the students to the detailing process.  The course shows how to evolve conceptual ideas into details that meet practical and pragmatic requirements.  The course will provide students with skills needed to solve detail-oriented problems in a rational way while maintaining the desired design aesthetic.  The students will be challenged with conceptual and practical approaches to create interior design and details related to vertical and horizontal planes. Prerequisites: INTD 1371 Computer Aided Drafting I, INTD 2377 Computer Aided Drafting II, and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 3370 Interior Design Professional Practice (3). This course introduces the student to the ethical business practices and procedures specific to the field of interior design. It also provides an in-depth study of the profession of interior design, including the current state of the profession, legislative issues, professional goals, legal responsibilities, and design contracts, including contract administration and project management. Oral communications skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 3372 Environmental Systems and Controls (3).  This course introduces technical building systems and engineering issues within a context of interior design.  It presents topics related to HVAC, water, and waste.  The student is given an opportunity to develop a vocabulary to effectively communicate with architects, engineers, and contractors.  An engagement with a broad range of building considerations prepares the student to effectively collaborate on a multitude of project typologies. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
INTD 3373 Human Factors and Ergonomics (3). This course focuses on the functional and aesthetics of interior environments examining the interface between man-made environments and humans.  Drawing on the fields of human behavior, health, and performance, students learn how to conduct ergonomic analyses and to apply the findings to improve design. Types of interior spaces, environmental effects on behavior, ergonomics, interior design needs of special groups, and human factors are studied. Emphasis is placed on the study of interactions of people and environments to ensure their effectiveness, safety, and ease of performance. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MATH 1332 Math for Liberal Arts I (3).  The course focuses on topics including sets, logic, number systems, functions, equivalence, congruence, measurement, other geometric concepts and the introduction of probability and statistics.  (3 Hrs. Lec.) Prerequisite: DMAT 0075 or an appropriate assessment test score.
MATH 1333 Math for Liberal Arts II (3). This course will include an introduction of financial concepts, logic, probability, statistics, and the use and development of graphs as related to the industries of merchandising and management. Prerequisite: MATH 1332 Math for Liberal Arts I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MGMT 2370 Principles of Management (3).  This course emphasizes the development and practice of managerial skills associated with self-awareness, stress management, problem-solving, workplace communications, motivational methods, conflict management, delegation and empowerment incorporated within the elements of teamwork, and aspects of leading positive change within managerial roles.
MGMT 2371 Management and Organizational Behavior (3). This course examines the various organizational levels, structure within organizations, and the behavioral nuances associated with organizations.  Emphasis is placed upon organizational structures and how those structures impact managerial practices and organizational behavior.  Prerequisite: MGMT 2370 Principles of Management and Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MGMT 2375 Human Resources Management (3). This course will offer a domestic and global perspective of the nuances within the field of human resources management. Students will gain an overview of theory and strategic and tactical approaches to human resources management, and how they apply to the domestic and global workforce.  Students will examine traditional and contemporary approaches to human resources management functions including recruitment, training, and retention. Prerequisite: MGMT 2370 Principles of Management and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MGMT 2376 Organizational Behavior and Human Resources Management (3).  This course will offer a domestic and global perspective of the nuances within the field of human resources management. Students will gain an overview of theory and strategic and tactical approaches to human resources management and how they apply to the domestic and global workforce. Students will examine traditional and contemporary approaches to human resources management functions including recruitment, training, and retention. This course also examines the various organizational levels, structure within organizations, and the behavioral nuances associated with organizations. Emphasis is placed upon organizational structures and how those structures impact managerial practices and organizational behavior. Prerequisite: MGMT 2370 Principles of Management and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MGMT 2379 Merchandise Buying, Planning, and Control (3). This course familiarizes students with the buyer’s responsibilities within the retail industry, including six-month plans, open to buy, model stock, vendor/supplier negotiations, presenting and selling the merchandise, and how these functions can best be performed to maximize profit. Retail reports are analyzed to familiarize the students with ways to react to business conditions. Students are introduced to profit and loss statements, pricing (both initial pricing and markdowns), planning sales, and inventory. Prerequisite: MRKT 2371 Buying and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MRKT 1371 Visual Branding and Store Planning I (3).  This course provides a study and application of display principles as related to the effective promotion of merchandise.  Included are design elements, color, store exteriors, store layout, fixtures, props, lighting, signage, mannequins, budget, and store theme.  The course is broadly based and brings the student beyond the role of a window dresser or trimmer.
MRKT 1375 Principles of Retailing (3).  This course provides a comprehensive study of the retail system covering a variety of key aspects associated with retailing in the 21st century.  Topics include a historical overview of retailing, current and emerging trends in retailing, domestic and international retail formats, multiculturalism impact on the retail sector, and the managerial, buying, and merchandising functions of the retail industry.
MRKT 2370 Principles of Marketing (3).  This course examines the scope and structure of marketing.  Marketing functions, market research, sales forecasting, creation and management of products and services, and the legal environment are analyzed.
MRKT 2371 Buying (3).  This course provides a detailed examination of buying practices and constraints at the retail and wholesale levels.  Special emphasis is placed on quantitative analysis of sales forecasting, stock levels, and profit factors.
MRKT 2373 Consumer Behavior (3).  This course focuses on consumer behavior and the buying process as it affects marketing.  Topics include attitudes, needs, motivations, perceptions, and the influence of social class, culture, and subculture on consumer behavior and behavior research.
MRKT 2375 Trend Forecasting (3). This course provides an overview and analysis of current color, fiber, and fashion trends, as well as their impact upon sales forecasting.  Students will research, analyze, and develop fashion forecasts related to specific seasons in the apparel industry. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MRKT2376 Social Media Marketing (3).  This course explores the concepts and application of branding through social media to equip the learner with skills to plan and implement a successful social media marketing strategy for an organization or individual. Course topics include the use of email/database marketing, affiliate marketing, using social media tools including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs and other current platforms to communicate promotions to current and prospective customers. Development of targeted content will be practiced. Management of back-end metrics will be explored through Google Analytics and Facebook Ad Manager. Prerequisite: MRKT 2370 Principles of Marketing and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MRKT 2377 Branding (3). This course surveys the best practices in brand management. Achievement of brand equity through the use of integrated marketing communications is explored by employing brand elements and leveraging strategies like brand extensions, co-branding, and strategic alliances with third parties. Prerequisite: MRKT 2370 Principles of Marketing and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MRKT 2378 Product Development and Manufacturing (3). This course introduces the process of merchandise selection for store branded, original product assortment.  Market and trend research will be addressed in order to prepare students for the development phase.  Students will be guided through the preproduction processes of product development: researching, planning, forecasting, fabricating, developing silhouettes and specifications, pricing, sourcing, producing, distributing, presenting, and analyzing. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
MRKT 2379 Visual Branding and Store Planning II (3).  This course covers concepts in commercial interior design as related to retail and wholesale sales environments including retail stores. Included are advanced study of design elements, color, store exteriors, store layout, fixtures, props, lighting, signage, mannequins, and store theme. The course will focus on mastery of floor plans and lighting plans. Construction and installation budget will serve as an important deliverable in the course. Prerequisite: MRKT 1371 Visual Branding and Store Planning I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
PSYC 2301 Psychology I (3).  This course is a survey of major topics in psychology.  Students are introduced to the science of psychology and various areas within the field, including the history of psychology, its relationship with biology, sensation and perception, consciousness, and learning.
PSYC 2303 Psychology II (3). Students are introduced to additional topics covered in the field of psychology including areas such as life span and personality development, thinking and intelligence, motivation and emotion, stress and adjustment, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 2301 Psychology I and junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
SPCH 1311 Introduction to Communication (3). This course covers the theory and practice of speech communication in interpersonal, small group, and public communication situations is emphasized.
SUCC 0075 Introduction to the Wade College Experience (0). This course introduces students to the total college experience—how to navigate through Wade College specifically, and how to handle college-level expectations generally.   Basic college and life success skills are introduced. The college’s academic programs, student services, general procedures and policies and library resources are also emphasized.
SUCC 0099 Portfolio Design and Presentation (0). This is a capstone course empowering students to develop positive and productive job-search skills for career success. The course introduces effective techniques for portfolio creation and presentation, and provides direction in creating resumes, cover letters, reference pages, and other tools for successful employment.
SUCC 2375 Professional Practices (3). This course empowers students to be resourceful when developing and implementing career planning tools, practical strategies, and self-promotion methods and portfolios to facilitate career success. Students explore personal traits, qualifications, career opportunities, and career paths. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.
SUCC 2379 Internship (3).  A three-credit hour internship course for baccalaureate-level students focusing on an industry-specific internship experience and on helping students plan their careers and market themselves professionally.  Prerequisite: A total of 100 hours at the worksite and 15 hours of on-campus instruction is required.  Enrollment in this course requires approval from the Office of Career Services and Director of Academic and Student Affairs and participation in a mandatory preparation process in the trimester prior to the class/work experience.  Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by permission of the President.

 

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